The link above is a video to my YouTube channel that helps understand Phase 2 of the Atkins diet or low-carb lifestyle I want to thank whomever is in charge of doing this website because I found a lot of information on here to be quite useful and I appreciate the fact that we can open up and share our ideas with each other I recently lost over a hundred pounds doing this and I just want to show other people with it also I have a Facebook group called healthy living for a healthy life so come join and check this out I wish everybody luck on this adventure of losing weight and becoming more healthy have a beautiful day thanks again
Hi I’m only new to LCHF and you’re information has been amazing, thank you! I have one question though I’m doing well cutting out sugar, breads etc but just wondering do I need to portion control my meals? Typically I have a 2 egg one letter with cheese, spinach and mushrooms for breakfast. Then warm chicken salad with rocket, cucumber, tomatoes, Persia fetta and a poaxhed egg. Dinner yellow curry with brocoli, carrot on cauliflower rice. Snack a low carb cheesecake, nuts maybe a smoothie.

I would agree with many, but not all of your points. “Fat and carbs don’t make us fat. It’s only processed fat (vegetable oil) and processed carbs (white flour and added sugar) in processed foods (foods with more than one ingredient) that inherently lead to overeating and weight gain.” I have also said this throughout my website and one of the biggest myths I try to bust is that we are not NO carb we are LOW carb. By removing processed food from our daily diet, we almost become low carb by default. Nutrient dense, low-carb whole foods are encouraged but not to be overdone. Lower carb diets reduce insulin resistance and inflammation. Lower carb diets, with healthy fats, gives a better blood lipid profile and lower TG which is the best predictor of heart health. There are so many benefits from eating nutrient dense lower carb whole foods.


I’ve tried low carb on and off over the years. It’s never stuck, and I’ve read a lot of advice that just hasn’t make it any more livable for me. I’ve settled on a lowER carb diet, ditching all flours, grains, dairy, and most sugars. I never eat junk food, and cook nearly everything myself. I eat enough fibrous vegetables (broccoli, cabbage, cauliflower…) and leafy greens to stay somewhat full. Water and black/green tea are my only beverages. Even though I gave up fruit for three whole months before, it wasn’t worth it for me. I will never give up fruit again, and the whole fruit-in-moderation advice didn’t work for me, either. Fresh fruit is the very last true culinary enjoyment I have left, and my quality of life without fresh fruit–berries, citrus, melons–plummets. I don’t eat dried fruit, and I work out five to six days a week with high intensity, focusing on large muscle groups; and walk with friends or alone nearly every day. I’d rather exercise more than give up fruit. I just came back from a session with my trainer and after a lean, nutritious lunch working at my desk, just had a snack of about 3/4-cup blueberries before meeting up with a friend in about a half hour for a 5-mile walk. And that snack (I’d have had more if I’d had more berries in the fridge) made today’s workout worth it for me.
Which leads us to your personality. You need to be VERY strong willed to follow this diet. It follows very strict rules and you need to be able to commit to this. It makes it hard to eat out with friends or eat with friends in general. It’s hard to find food that fits this diet in common restaurants, but and this takes us to the next point, your health goals might be more important.
I am wheat & dairy free for other allergy related conditions so find it hard to stick with the low carb diet. I simply cannot do any cream or milk products & tolerate small amounts of cheese. I find food very boring & then fall back on the gluten free junk. I have added coconut cream/ yoghurt & almond milk to smoothies with berries or a banana plus protein powder for breakfast. I know the banana not great but really miss real fruit. Frozen berries for most of the year not really doing it for me. Any ideas for snacks and treats that r still low carb so I don’t feel like a total ‘food leper’ my husband’s tongue in check explanation for me.

Hi Kristy, that is great that you have discovered us and you have a LCHF nutritionist on board. You are ahead of the game already! This will be an exciting time ahead for you as you will really learn so much about nutrition and your health. You will discover new ways to cook, which will eventually become your new favourites. You will lose weight and gain so much energy. You will also lose that constant feeling of guilt associated with eating, which is what I had. Eat too much, feel guilty, eat less, then overeat because you’re starving, feel guilty, and so the cycle continues. My weight has remained below my weight watchers goal for 2 years now without counting a single thing, how refreshing and healthy. You will gain control of your appetite and actually want to eat nutritious foods. Wheat and sugary foods no longer appeal (this is from me who used to buy 5kg bags of flour for my baking).


There is extensive evidence for the benefit of the Mediterranean style low carb diet, including cutting your risk of heart disease and diabetes. It has even been found to reduce risk the risk of breast cancer, compared with those on a low-fat diet. Consuming extra virgin olive oil (the fresh squeezed juice of olives) seems to be particularly beneficial when it comes to cancer, perhaps because it contains compounds such as polyphenols which are known to be anti-inflammatory.
I know you posted a few months ago, but I thought I would reply just incase its still relevant. After having a daughter who LOVES veges, I then had my son who at a year old suddenly refused veges. It was getting so bad he would make himself throw it up if we forced him. But we kept on going trying everything we could while getting extremely frustrated (While also being told by everyone he was too small and sickly (Which he always was but got worse when he stopped eating the veges)
Use fat as a lever.  We’ve been taught to fear fat, but don’t! Both keto and low carb are high fat diets. Fat is our source of energy as well as satiety. The key to understand, though, is that fat is a lever on a low carb or keto diet. Carbs and protein stay constant, and fat is the one you increase or decrease (push the lever up or down) to gain or lose weight, respectively. So if your goal is weight loss, eat enough fat to be satisfied, but there’s no need to “get your fats in” once you’re satisfied.
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