But even if you’re not trying to lose weight, the keto meal plans might appeal to you. By limiting sugars and processed grains, you lower your risk of type 2 diabetes. Eating an array of heart-healthy fats, like nuts, olive oil and fish, can decrease your risk of heart disease. And while some people stick to a super strict keto diet, with 75 percent of their diet coming from fat, 20 percent from protein and just five from carbs, even a less intense, modified version can help you reap the keto diet’s benefits.

Net carbs is simply total carbs minus fiber and non-digestible sugar alcohols, like erythritol. (This doesn’t apply to high glycemic sugar alcohols, like maltitol.) We don’t have to count fiber and certain sugar alcohols in net carbs, because they either don’t get broken down by our bodies, are not absorbed, or are absorbed but not metabolized. (Read more about sugar alcohols here.)
Hi Jose, I don’t have cheat days at all. If I do ever splurge, it is possibly eating too many low carb goodies I make myself. I just have completely lost the taste for junk food. As for weight loss, eating lasagne and cheesecake, pizza, burgers and nutella can easily undo all your hard work for the entire week. Why not try to have a cheats meal rather than a cheat day? Part of the ethos of going low carb is to eat unprocessed food so I have recipes for all of these foods you still love and can enjoy them AND stay low carb. Try my sugar free nutella, low carb waffles, FatHead pizza, bunless burgers, cheesecake. I am sure a major reason for LCHF being so successful long term is because eventually we don’t actually want junk food, it’s not a treat anymore. This for me, is groundbreaking as someone who has dieted all my life.
I too have been a yo-yo dieter for decades and I ended up paying WW to actually put ON weight. Then I discovered LCHF and well … the rest is history as they say. The main difference between Atkins and LCHF is Atkins never really focussed on whole foods (just think of their range of shakes, bars, candy etc) they are also reported to eat much higher protein and most of their phases aren’t actually keto, more of a low-carb “ish” plan and may include some sugars and grains. Why not join the FREE support group (no money required) and learn all the tips and tricks and my stepwise method to get you back on track. Welcome aboard!
Good question. There is no doubt that grass fed, free range, organic is best but it is simply out of the price range of so many. What is more important to start with is to eat real whole food as best as you can find. I certainly don’t buy organic all the time. Do what you can when you can. It is more important to change from cereals to eggs rather then getting hung up on a perfect source of egg. Take a look at my food brands page. It needs updating as I change brands all the time as I find better ones, but is helpful. I really try and make this as easy on ourselves as we can. We shouldn’t need a degree in nutrition to eat well. Some sites complicate things far too much. My motto is “do the best you can as often as you can”. I agree, labels are pretty poor and not standardised (net vs total carbs for example). Good luck 🙂

I’ve tried low carb on and off over the years. It’s never stuck, and I’ve read a lot of advice that just hasn’t make it any more livable for me. I’ve settled on a lowER carb diet, ditching all flours, grains, dairy, and most sugars. I never eat junk food, and cook nearly everything myself. I eat enough fibrous vegetables (broccoli, cabbage, cauliflower…) and leafy greens to stay somewhat full. Water and black/green tea are my only beverages. Even though I gave up fruit for three whole months before, it wasn’t worth it for me. I will never give up fruit again, and the whole fruit-in-moderation advice didn’t work for me, either. Fresh fruit is the very last true culinary enjoyment I have left, and my quality of life without fresh fruit–berries, citrus, melons–plummets. I don’t eat dried fruit, and I work out five to six days a week with high intensity, focusing on large muscle groups; and walk with friends or alone nearly every day. I’d rather exercise more than give up fruit. I just came back from a session with my trainer and after a lean, nutritious lunch working at my desk, just had a snack of about 3/4-cup blueberries before meeting up with a friend in about a half hour for a 5-mile walk. And that snack (I’d have had more if I’d had more berries in the fridge) made today’s workout worth it for me.

Hi Cyn, The numbers are general guidelines but will vary depending on many factors, such as activity level, insulin resistance, weight and more. There is no single magic number, just conventional recommendations that are a good starting point. I will have a macro calculator coming soon that will help determine what is best for each person, but even then it’s an approximation. The only way to know for sure is to test. If keto is your goal, it’s usually best to start lower and then see if you can stay in ketosis when increasing.
Hi I’m new to Keto. I have been reading about it, and understanding what to eat and what not to eat. My problem is I’m not sure if I’m doing it correctly. I’m constantly hungry whereas information reads that I will never be hungry. I use fats as required along with topping up with vegetables in my meals yet this does not fill me up. I haven’t experienced the Keto flu and I’ve even put on weight! I have been doing this for about 3 weeks now. Any ideas where I am going wrong.

I personally don’t count anymore as I want this to be as easy and sustainable as possible. I have had years of counting calories and points, and this is incredibly liberating. I just don’t eat any sugars, grains or high carb foods any more so I am incredibly low carb all the time. When I was starting out I counted, just to see where my carbs were coming from and it was an eye opener. And yes you are correct, to go into ketosis anywhere between 20-50g carbs/day. Find out what works for you.
"Your body will often shift metabolism when you do something different to it -- but it equalizes -- you see a rapid shift and a return to normal -- and the longer-term studies show normal results in this area," says Sondike. Still, he tells WebMD it's a "smart idea" to take a calcium supplement beginning at the start of your low-carb diet to safeguard against a possible deficiency. Tofu can also be a good source of calcium.
I am wheat & dairy free for other allergy related conditions so find it hard to stick with the low carb diet. I simply cannot do any cream or milk products & tolerate small amounts of cheese. I find food very boring & then fall back on the gluten free junk. I have added coconut cream/ yoghurt & almond milk to smoothies with berries or a banana plus protein powder for breakfast. I know the banana not great but really miss real fruit. Frozen berries for most of the year not really doing it for me. Any ideas for snacks and treats that r still low carb so I don’t feel like a total ‘food leper’ my husband’s tongue in check explanation for me.

What a great post. I thought i would add about the selection of food you eat on keto and that everyone is different. Some food gives you energy and some doesnt, this varies person to person. I started and quit keto 3 times before i managed to find my balance. The first few times it made be poorly, from the shock of diet change. However, you can wean yourself into the diet which i did the last time when i had the most success.

Good question. There is no doubt that grass fed, free range, organic is best but it is simply out of the price range of so many. What is more important to start with is to eat real whole food as best as you can find. I certainly don’t buy organic all the time. Do what you can when you can. It is more important to change from cereals to eggs rather then getting hung up on a perfect source of egg. Take a look at my food brands page. It needs updating as I change brands all the time as I find better ones, but is helpful. I really try and make this as easy on ourselves as we can. We shouldn’t need a degree in nutrition to eat well. Some sites complicate things far too much. My motto is “do the best you can as often as you can”. I agree, labels are pretty poor and not standardised (net vs total carbs for example). Good luck 🙂
No deep fryers or air fryers needed for these wings! Forget those greasy chicken wings you’d order at a restaurant and opt-in for these homemade guiltless garlic parmesan wings. You won’t find rancid vegetable oil, gluten or a deep frier here — just avocado oil, healthy pecorino romano and free-range, organic chicken for a twist on an otherwise unhealthy classic.

Forget the heavy casserole recipes and try this low-carb pot pie tonight! Nothing says comfort food like a chicken pot pie. This low-carb pot pie recipe skips the traditional gluten-filled dough of chicken pot pies and replaces it with cauliflower for a more low-carb option. I simply suggest switching out the cornstarch with arrowroot or tapioca starch.
You made me smile with the food leper reference. Love it. As for snacks, there is a page here and here to look at and here is my snack finder. Boiled eggs, avocados, pork crackling, nuts, fat bombs, calamari, granola bars, cold meats … I hope these give you some ideas. Eventually the goal is to stop snacking, but in theme time, these might help you out.
Second: Most of us eat too many carbs to begin with. About half of our calories should come from carbs, according to the USDA Dietary Guidelines for Americans. That's about 250 grams per day for a 2,000 calorie diet, or even fewer if you're eating less than that. When you consider all of the grain-based foods and sneaky sources of added sugar, it's easy eat a whole lot more than the recommended amount.
Then don’t give up the fruit! Go for it. You sound like a fit and active person within the normal weight range. Generally the advice is to stay off excessive fruit, and high sugar fruit especially if people are overweight or have other health issues, then in that case fruit is not your friend. But with everything, eat within your personal carb limitations and eat to what is appropriate to you. Whole fruit is somewhat self limiting due to the fibre and water anyhow. You obviously have worked out a fabulous routine and it is working, so why change, stick with it Tom and enjoy 🙂
This is the only way my kids will eat Brussels sprouts! It’s actually great for me because this dish is fast, easy and healthy, and it makes a lovely side. Quick-cooking Brussels sprout halves are available in the prepackaged salad aisle at the grocery store. They’re a timesaver if you can find them, but you can always just buy whole ones and slice them in half. —Teri Rasey, Cadillac, Michigan

I’ve tried low carb on and off over the years. It’s never stuck, and I’ve read a lot of advice that just hasn’t make it any more livable for me. I’ve settled on a lowER carb diet, ditching all flours, grains, dairy, and most sugars. I never eat junk food, and cook nearly everything myself. I eat enough fibrous vegetables (broccoli, cabbage, cauliflower…) and leafy greens to stay somewhat full. Water and black/green tea are my only beverages. Even though I gave up fruit for three whole months before, it wasn’t worth it for me. I will never give up fruit again, and the whole fruit-in-moderation advice didn’t work for me, either. Fresh fruit is the very last true culinary enjoyment I have left, and my quality of life without fresh fruit–berries, citrus, melons–plummets. I don’t eat dried fruit, and I work out five to six days a week with high intensity, focusing on large muscle groups; and walk with friends or alone nearly every day. I’d rather exercise more than give up fruit. I just came back from a session with my trainer and after a lean, nutritious lunch working at my desk, just had a snack of about 3/4-cup blueberries before meeting up with a friend in about a half hour for a 5-mile walk. And that snack (I’d have had more if I’d had more berries in the fridge) made today’s workout worth it for me.
I would agree with many, but not all of your points. “Fat and carbs don’t make us fat. It’s only processed fat (vegetable oil) and processed carbs (white flour and added sugar) in processed foods (foods with more than one ingredient) that inherently lead to overeating and weight gain.” I have also said this throughout my website and one of the biggest myths I try to bust is that we are not NO carb we are LOW carb. By removing processed food from our daily diet, we almost become low carb by default. Nutrient dense, low-carb whole foods are encouraged but not to be overdone. Lower carb diets reduce insulin resistance and inflammation. Lower carb diets, with healthy fats, gives a better blood lipid profile and lower TG which is the best predictor of heart health. There are so many benefits from eating nutrient dense lower carb whole foods.
If you're looking to test-drive a low carb recipes menu or if your current meal plan needs rejuvenation, we've pulled together a 7 Day Meal Plan with all Low Carb Diet Recipes to help you meet your weight loss goals. It'll be hard to turn down these amazing healthy meal plan. We don't know why you'd want to because not only are they nutritious, they're also delicious. With a mix of savory recipes and healthy dessert recipes on this page, you're sure to find recipes that will help you curb your cravings! After all, you don't want to undo your progress by picking up a few unhealthy snacks at the nearest vending machine.
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