Net carbs is simply total carbs minus fiber and non-digestible sugar alcohols, like erythritol. (This doesn’t apply to high glycemic sugar alcohols, like maltitol.) We don’t have to count fiber and certain sugar alcohols in net carbs, because they either don’t get broken down by our bodies, are not absorbed, or are absorbed but not metabolized. (Read more about sugar alcohols here.)
You made me smile with the food leper reference. Love it. As for snacks, there is a page here and here to look at and here is my snack finder. Boiled eggs, avocados, pork crackling, nuts, fat bombs, calamari, granola bars, cold meats … I hope these give you some ideas. Eventually the goal is to stop snacking, but in theme time, these might help you out.

Some diets cut calories from all macronutrients (protein, fat and carbs) in equal amounts. Others cut from fat, and some buzzy types cut from carbs. But the end result is the same: You cut calories, you'll lose weight. If you eat them in excess, you'll gain weight. So just because you've eliminated one macronutrient doesn't give you free rein to chow down on another type of food!
Many people starting out go by the rule of 5g carbs per 100g. I totally empathise with you about fearing the fat. I slowly reduced my carb and slowly increased my healthy fats until I got to a comfortable level (which may be different for everyone). Don’t overdo the fat, we want to be using our bodies fat stores, but we do need to eat enough to keep us full and keep the carbs away. So eat healthy fat until full, eat meals until no longer hungry, and remove processed food from your diet and you almost become low carb by default.

Some keto cookies or a keto brownie can certainly be delicious, but if you’re looking for a dessert that’s a little more interesting, then you have to try this chocolate chia pudding! I love chia seeds for a number of reasons. They’re high in antioxidants, vitamins such as calcium, potassium and magnesium, Omega-3 ALA, dietary fiber and even protein. So, while this dish feels like a dessert, you’re receiving plenty of necessary nutrients. Enjoy guilty-free!

Hi Jose, I don’t have cheat days at all. If I do ever splurge, it is possibly eating too many low carb goodies I make myself. I just have completely lost the taste for junk food. As for weight loss, eating lasagne and cheesecake, pizza, burgers and nutella can easily undo all your hard work for the entire week. Why not try to have a cheats meal rather than a cheat day? Part of the ethos of going low carb is to eat unprocessed food so I have recipes for all of these foods you still love and can enjoy them AND stay low carb. Try my sugar free nutella, low carb waffles, FatHead pizza, bunless burgers, cheesecake. I am sure a major reason for LCHF being so successful long term is because eventually we don’t actually want junk food, it’s not a treat anymore. This for me, is groundbreaking as someone who has dieted all my life.
Hi Libby. Re foods to eat. Still a newbie and exploring all this. Re the foods for example cocnut cream- is there a specific brand or type you,should buy? Same with butter and meats- re grass fed versus grain fed. Coconut oil- is there ones you should or shouldn’t use brand wise. Lchf site says grass fed meat and butter. Does it have to say organic on the butter. Labelling is really bad in regards to this. And your cheeses- re Brie for,example- are they all they same or are there certain ones of them you have to buy ? This goes for all cheese that you can have to- are there ones better for you than others?
I personally don’t count anymore as I want this to be as easy and sustainable as possible. I have had years of counting calories and points, and this is incredibly liberating. I just don’t eat any sugars, grains or high carb foods any more so I am incredibly low carb all the time. When I was starting out I counted, just to see where my carbs were coming from and it was an eye opener. And yes you are correct, to go into ketosis anywhere between 20-50g carbs/day. Find out what works for you.
Hi Cyn, The numbers are general guidelines but will vary depending on many factors, such as activity level, insulin resistance, weight and more. There is no single magic number, just conventional recommendations that are a good starting point. I will have a macro calculator coming soon that will help determine what is best for each person, but even then it’s an approximation. The only way to know for sure is to test. If keto is your goal, it’s usually best to start lower and then see if you can stay in ketosis when increasing.
If you aren’t already following my Easy Keto/Low Carb Recipe Page on Facebook where I post all my new recipes, you can join here and follow me on Pinterest here. If you are just getting started following a keto diet and would like more information, there are tons of fantastic resources. Amazon has several excellent books you may want to check out here. It’s all about learning what works best for you and your family.
This content is strictly the opinion of Dr. Josh Axe and is for informational and educational purposes only. It is not intended to provide medical advice or to take the place of medical advice or treatment from a personal physician. All readers/viewers of this content are advised to consult their doctors or qualified health professionals regarding specific health questions. Neither Dr. Axe nor the publisher of this content takes responsibility for possible health consequences of any person or persons reading or following the information in this educational content. All viewers of this content, especially those taking prescription or over-the-counter medications, should consult their physicians before beginning any nutrition, supplement or lifestyle program.
Net carbs is simply total carbs minus fiber and non-digestible sugar alcohols, like erythritol. (This doesn’t apply to high glycemic sugar alcohols, like maltitol.) We don’t have to count fiber and certain sugar alcohols in net carbs, because they either don’t get broken down by our bodies, are not absorbed, or are absorbed but not metabolized. (Read more about sugar alcohols here.) 

Many people starting out go by the rule of 5g carbs per 100g. I totally empathise with you about fearing the fat. I slowly reduced my carb and slowly increased my healthy fats until I got to a comfortable level (which may be different for everyone). Don’t overdo the fat, we want to be using our bodies fat stores, but we do need to eat enough to keep us full and keep the carbs away. So eat healthy fat until full, eat meals until no longer hungry, and remove processed food from your diet and you almost become low carb by default.
What else happens when we break down muscle glycogen? We lose water weight! Our muscles store about 3 grams of water for every gram of glycogen, meaning we can lose quite a bit of weight right away when we tap into glycogen stores for fuel. That's why someone who loses weight in "just one week!" from a low-carb plan is likely losing water weight, not necessarily real weight that stays off over time.

I too have been a yo-yo dieter for decades and I ended up paying WW to actually put ON weight. Then I discovered LCHF and well … the rest is history as they say. The main difference between Atkins and LCHF is Atkins never really focussed on whole foods (just think of their range of shakes, bars, candy etc) they are also reported to eat much higher protein and most of their phases aren’t actually keto, more of a low-carb “ish” plan and may include some sugars and grains. Why not join the FREE support group (no money required) and learn all the tips and tricks and my stepwise method to get you back on track. Welcome aboard!

Hi. I stumbled on your site via FB. I follow a lot of the advice you offer already. I typically eat scrambled eggs with turkey, a piece of wholebread toast and coffee for breakfast, salad and breast of chicken with vegetables for lunch and something similar (chicken or red meat or salmon) for dinner, with 2 snacks of 3 rice cakes with 150 gr. of turkey and a protein shake if I go to the gym (weights training 3x week). In the first 3 months of eating like this my % fat went down from 17.5 % to 14 % (44 yr old male), while keeping weight constant, but another 4 months later I stay the same. I wanted to ask, if I want to continue to lose fat, should I:
Carrie, I highly recommend a support group. I personally know a woman “Amanda Rose” who recently lost half her body weight through the Keto Diet and intermittent fasting. You should totally join her Facebook Group. It’s called “Eat Like a Bear” and you can find it by entering the group’s name in the Facebook search bar. She is so amazing and so supportive for people struggling to lose the weight.
Keto recipes that include nachos?! Oh yes. You’ll begin by making the fat head tortilla chips first. Did I mention you’ll use two types of cheese for this step? Delicious. Next, you’ll load them up with a meaty sauce and finish them off with your favorite toppings, like guac, salsa or sour cream. While these make a delicious keto snack, they’re frankly filling enough to share as a meal.

I personally don’t count anymore as I want this to be as easy and sustainable as possible. I have had years of counting calories and points, and this is incredibly liberating. I just don’t eat any sugars, grains or high carb foods any more so I am incredibly low carb all the time. When I was starting out I counted, just to see where my carbs were coming from and it was an eye opener. And yes you are correct, to go into ketosis anywhere between 20-50g carbs/day. Find out what works for you.

My Husband and I started doing Keto July 2018. We got over weight after we got out of the Marine Corps. It has been hard to workout because I became disabled, but my diet was not good. After our friend Amber recommended your site and support group, we found a lot of helpful information to get us started on a successful journey. So far it’s been one month and we have lost 18 pounds each!
It will take a while to trust and adjust to your new appetite. I personally found when I was low fat and on Weight Watchers, I was ravenous all day long, so to be told eat what you like was difficult to understand. By eating more healthy fats especially, will keep you fuller for longer. And depending on how long you have been dieting for, and how insulin resistant you are, will depend on how long it takes for you to adjust appetite and weight. The odd person gains weight when they start because they don’t listen to their body. Remember to eat until 80% full (it takes a while for your stomach to register you have eaten your meal) and only eat when hungry. Don’t snack if you don’t have to. Are you really hungry or thirsty (similar feelings).
Your body uses carbohydrates as its main fuel source. Complex carbohydrates (starches) are broken down into simple sugars during digestion. They're then absorbed into your bloodstream, where they're known as blood sugar (glucose). In general, natural complex carbohydrates are digested more slowly and they have less effect on blood sugar. Natural complex carbohydrates provide bulk and serve other body functions beyond fuel.

If you’re not sure after your initial test, explore other healthy diets such as clean eating and always have in mind that your number 1 goal should be to avoid overly processed foods (keeping this definition fairly broad of course, as we live in the 21st century and have to adapt to modern age as well, where hardly any of us have time to spend 12 hours a day evolving around food production, gathering and cooking).
Hi, I’m still a bit skeptical, I have seen some of my friends do the keto diet, and have had good results. Though I am still not sure about the idea of the fats being eaten. They say they eat meat with the fat and must do so, is this correct? Also isn’t this not good for the body especially for the kidneys? Second, can a diabetic do this diet? There are many questions running through my head.
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