I started seeing a nutritionist, who has started me on a B-12 injection 2 times monthly, and a LCHF diet. He wants me to stay between 20-35 carbs daily for at least 3 months. He says I need to buy ketone strips, to make sure I don’t go into ketoacidosis, however, I am otherwise healthy, and not diabetic. Is this something I need to be overly concerned about? I’m on my 4th day of approx. 25 carbs daily, and other than a slight headache, I feel fine.
I know you posted a few months ago, but I thought I would reply just incase its still relevant. After having a daughter who LOVES veges, I then had my son who at a year old suddenly refused veges. It was getting so bad he would make himself throw it up if we forced him. But we kept on going trying everything we could while getting extremely frustrated (While also being told by everyone he was too small and sickly (Which he always was but got worse when he stopped eating the veges)
Drink lots of water. This is especially crucial on a low carb or keto diet. Why? When you eat carbohydrates, your body stores the extra as glycogen in the liver, where they are bound to water molecules. Eating low carb depletes this glycogen, which allows you to burn fat – but it also means you are storing less water, making it easier to get dehydrated. Instead of the traditional recommendation of 8 cups of water per day, aim for 16 cups when following a low carb lifestyle.
Hi Silvy, these are quite common concerns when starting out low carb. By increasing your healthy fats you will feel full and satiated for longer, than quick burning carbs. You will also reap all the health benefits from lowering your carbs, eating good quality protein and increasing your fats from healthy sources. It may take a while for your appetite to adapt to be running on more fat than carbs, but it is so incredibly wonderful to finally be off the high/low sugar roller coaster. Good luck with starting out and join us on Facebook for daily tips and subscribe for free recipes when I post them. Libby 🙂
I started seeing a nutritionist, who has started me on a B-12 injection 2 times monthly, and a LCHF diet. He wants me to stay between 20-35 carbs daily for at least 3 months. He says I need to buy ketone strips, to make sure I don’t go into ketoacidosis, however, I am otherwise healthy, and not diabetic. Is this something I need to be overly concerned about? I’m on my 4th day of approx. 25 carbs daily, and other than a slight headache, I feel fine.
Weekends can be difficult if you are surrounded by others not eating this way, or eating out. Take little bags of nuts with you, cubes of cheese, slices of deli meat, squares of dark chocolate or go for creamy coffees, they tend to keep me full for hours. When eating out, go for simple dishes such as steak and blue cheese with veggies, salads but no croutons, think meat’n’veg and no sauces is an easy way to continue when out. Some cafes sell frittatas with no pastry, quiche, etc. Even if you buy a huge meat and salad wrap then deconstruct it and eat the filling is another good option. Once you start getting the idea, you can adapt most things. Good luck Shireen 🙂

Hi Gigi, Low carb and keto is about the balance of macronutrients eaten (fat, protein and carbs), not specifically meat or lack thereof. Most people on keto do eat meat, though some people do vegetarian keto. Fat is actually necessary for many body processes. There is no issue for the kidneys with a high fat diet, but if you eat too much protein that isn’t great for the kidneys. It’s a common misconception that keto is high protein (it isn’t). Keto is great for diabetics as it naturally helps stabilize insulin. All of this being said, please know I’m not a doctor and you should consult your doctor on any medical questions or before starting any diet. If you have more questions that aren’t medical questions, I recommend our low carb & keto support group here.
The reason why low-carb plans so often fail most of us is that they're not sustainable for the long term. They often fail to provide a "fallback" plan for what to eat when low-carb foods aren't readily available. Birthdays, holidays, work functions … there's likely at least one scenario in which you'll find yourself eating high-carb foods that don't necessarily "fit" into your plan.
my children regularly make themselves smoothies, bacon (2 minutes in the microwave covered with kitchen paper), scrambled eggs with cheese in the microwave (mix 2 eggs, cheese, milk – 1 minute, stir, 30 seconds, stir, 30 seconds, stir). They used to moan and complain there are no cereals in the house, but they have learned to cook their own breakfasts and look for what ingredients we have rather than reach for a box of cornflakes
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