Low-carb diets may improve high-density lipoprotein (HDL) cholesterol and triglyceride values slightly more than do moderate-carb diets. That may be due not only to how many carbs you eat but also to the quality of your other food choices. Lean protein (fish, poultry, legumes), healthy fats (monounsaturated and polyunsaturated) and unprocessed carbs — such as whole grains, legumes, vegetables, fruits and low-fat dairy products — are generally healthier choices.

I am starting on low carbs as I have been advised that my body doesn’t deal well with carbs and I am at risk of diabetes. I also need to lose weight. I understand your principles of ‘doing the best you can’, avoiding processed foods etc, but wondered if there is a general rule of thumb to go by when reading food labels, such as aiming for food with no more than 2% carbs?
I have just moved from South Africa, where lchf is commio and very supported, to the Isle of Man, where people just don’t seem to be in the know. I am BATTLING to find my foods, especially grain-free beakfast ‘cereal’, mixed seeds and psyllium husk for baking into crisp breads. Can anyone let me know where to get them, please? Is there anywhere online that would supply them?
Carrie, I highly recommend a support group. I personally know a woman “Amanda Rose” who recently lost half her body weight through the Keto Diet and intermittent fasting. You should totally join her Facebook Group. It’s called “Eat Like a Bear” and you can find it by entering the group’s name in the Facebook search bar. She is so amazing and so supportive for people struggling to lose the weight.
In one week my husband lost 1.5 kg because of Keto diet and recipes. Thank you for the insights and tips. I would like to have a complete recipe for meals everyday and hoping by subscribing I will receive try my mail. I will keep u posted. It takes 2 to tango. The one who wants to diet must be cooperative with the plan and execution while the other person who is preparing the food must be patient to the dieting person. Its not easy to change meals so patience is required 

Each day, we've given you an idea for breakfast, lunch, healthy dinner recipes, and snacks. You will love how easy and delicious these low carb recipes are to make. If you follow this low carb meal plan, you will definitely be on the right path towards a healthier lifestyle. These low carb diet recipes include options the entire family will love, too.
The key is to make sure you are getting enough energy from fats and proteins. By going low carb you will probably be eating a wider range of healthy vegetables, meats and healthy fats compared to many other nursing mothers who may be snacking on bread, crisps and cakes. Also make sure you are drinking enough fluids. Here is a good thread from a discussion board on exactly this topic.
Research suggests that eating a low-calorie, low-carb diet can help you lose weight. And while popular low-carb diets, like the ketogenic diet and Atkins diet call for super-low carb limits, you don't actually need to go that low in order to lose the weight. In fact, eating too few carbs can make weight loss harder, as you miss out on key nutrients (like fiber from whole grains, beans, fruits and vegetables) that can help you to feel full and satisfied on fewer calories. In this easy low-carb meal plan, we keep the carbs low, but not so low that you'll miss out on those important nutrients. Plus, we made sure to include enough protein each day (over 50 grams) to help you feel satisfied while cutting carbs and calories. At 1,200 daily calories, this low-carb high-protein meal plan can help you lose a healthy 1 to 2 pounds per week.
Severely restricting carbohydrates to less than 0.7 ounces (20 grams) a day can result in a process called ketosis. Ketosis occurs when you don't have enough sugar (glucose) for energy, so your body breaks down stored fat, causing ketones to build up in your body. Side effects from ketosis can include nausea, headache, mental and physical fatigue, and bad breath.
I am starting on low carbs as I have been advised that my body doesn’t deal well with carbs and I am at risk of diabetes. I also need to lose weight. I understand your principles of ‘doing the best you can’, avoiding processed foods etc, but wondered if there is a general rule of thumb to go by when reading food labels, such as aiming for food with no more than 2% carbs?
There are vegetables that are high in carbs and others low in carbs. The keto diet recommends sticking to the ones low on carbs but encourages you to eat a lot of them. Best vegetables are all green ones to make it easy. And vegetables that grow above the ground (e.g. lettuce) are always better than the ones that grow below the ground (e.g. potatoes)
Hi Jose, I don’t have cheat days at all. If I do ever splurge, it is possibly eating too many low carb goodies I make myself. I just have completely lost the taste for junk food. As for weight loss, eating lasagne and cheesecake, pizza, burgers and nutella can easily undo all your hard work for the entire week. Why not try to have a cheats meal rather than a cheat day? Part of the ethos of going low carb is to eat unprocessed food so I have recipes for all of these foods you still love and can enjoy them AND stay low carb. Try my sugar free nutella, low carb waffles, FatHead pizza, bunless burgers, cheesecake. I am sure a major reason for LCHF being so successful long term is because eventually we don’t actually want junk food, it’s not a treat anymore. This for me, is groundbreaking as someone who has dieted all my life.
The reason why low-carb plans so often fail most of us is that they're not sustainable for the long term. They often fail to provide a "fallback" plan for what to eat when low-carb foods aren't readily available. Birthdays, holidays, work functions … there's likely at least one scenario in which you'll find yourself eating high-carb foods that don't necessarily "fit" into your plan.
When weight loss stalls something needs to change. Firstly it could be that you are near your goal weight and so you have found a natural balance, secondly other things might be creeping back in that you have forgotten to count (for example too many creamy coffees or an extra glass of wine). Take a look at how much you are eating for breakfast and dinner, are they too big and actually the same size as 3 meals just eaten in 2? Nuts, dairy and alcohol are generally the biggest culprits in stalling weight loss. Sometimes we just have to remind ourselves of the health benefits of LCHF rather than the weight loss. It will happen, albeit slower than we would wish. For me it is about no longer counting anything, no longer being on the sugar roller coaster, improved nutrition and no longer having any guilt surrounding every meal or snack. Good luck and be patient my friend 🙂
I’ve tried low carb on and off over the years. It’s never stuck, and I’ve read a lot of advice that just hasn’t make it any more livable for me. I’ve settled on a lowER carb diet, ditching all flours, grains, dairy, and most sugars. I never eat junk food, and cook nearly everything myself. I eat enough fibrous vegetables (broccoli, cabbage, cauliflower…) and leafy greens to stay somewhat full. Water and black/green tea are my only beverages. Even though I gave up fruit for three whole months before, it wasn’t worth it for me. I will never give up fruit again, and the whole fruit-in-moderation advice didn’t work for me, either. Fresh fruit is the very last true culinary enjoyment I have left, and my quality of life without fresh fruit–berries, citrus, melons–plummets. I don’t eat dried fruit, and I work out five to six days a week with high intensity, focusing on large muscle groups; and walk with friends or alone nearly every day. I’d rather exercise more than give up fruit. I just came back from a session with my trainer and after a lean, nutritious lunch working at my desk, just had a snack of about 3/4-cup blueberries before meeting up with a friend in about a half hour for a 5-mile walk. And that snack (I’d have had more if I’d had more berries in the fridge) made today’s workout worth it for me.
Oh, by the way : We are prematurely killing our beloved pets with carbs. Dogs and especially cats need to eat meat, but commercial pet food is mostly corn & wheat, which was bad enough before being poisoned by weed killer (“Round-Up” which is soaked into all American grain today) …. Huge numbers of cats and dogs now suffer & die from kidney failure, and the only explanation is what we are feeding them. My kitties now get chicken and tuna, which is a lot cheaper than any ‘gourmet’ canned food. Cooking for them is kinda fun, for that matter.
×